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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
, florida, stumping there just two days before el t election day. we'll continue to monitor his remarks there before he moves on to the next battleground state. we're going to take you to new york, hot soup warming the hearts of so many recovering from superstorm sandy, all in the backyard of this guy right here. [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. >>> a lot of runners who travel to new york city to run in that new york city marathon this morning, instead headed to staten island and other areas hit hard by that superstorm sandy. they delivered relief supplies and helped victims clean out their flooded homes and though the storm's that struck -- intent on running the race they had trained for months to finish. they participated in unofficial alternative marathon that was organized on facebook. >>> celebrity chef and cookbook author was born in queens and his culinary career has inclu
at our blog at ed.msnbc.com. >> one of the big hurd els that president obama has right now is to get white working male os his side. how do you see that playing out from what you've been able to see on the ground in ohio. >> that's exactly why he went to lake county today. it's a place i know well, i was born and raised in that county and it was a tight one in 2008. barack obama pulled it out by less than 1%, but it's a county that's 95% whoit and it's a place where barack obama believes that his economic message will resonate. he was hitting hard in his speech today. he was enn in the 82 out of 88 counties that have businesses that are related to the auto industry, is the controversy that's gone on over that widely discredited ad put out by the romney campaign. and if you talk to people on the ground, one of the things that they'll tell you is that they think there has been a backlash against that ad. that the voters here know exactly what's going on in the auto industry. one out of every eight jobs is tied to the auto industry and they say they're not being fooled by it. i also tal
, for the party to push off and move back and embrace a different kind of vision that could have more ele ele electoral success than romney's. i think jindal's pushback is a good example of how the party might use that latest gaffe to kind of move beyond mitt romney. >> if you could play the rubio quote, because that's how not to do it. very interesting. this is somebody who's not getting it. >> he's being very careful. i'll read rubio's quote. then i'm going to play haley barbour. this is senator marco rubio of florida who is careful in his wording. he tells "politico," i don't want to rebut him point by point. i would just say to you, i don't believe that we have millions and millions of people in this country that don't want to work. okay. and then former mississippi governor haley barbour suggested the whole republican party -- >> did haley measure his words? >> he thought about it long and hard and then just went there. take a look. >> we've got to give our political organizational activity, you know, a very serious proctology exam. i think that's the only -- we need to look everywhere i
in this battleground state, a million people either call themselves catholic or eveng el angelical. this is key especially when you're talking about a state like iowa, which folks here describe to me as split right down the middle or a purple state. in the heart of des moines, evangelical christians flock to grace church to talk faith, family and the presidential election. >> honestly, what it all boils down to is what does the bible say and which candidate is going to follow the closest? >> for bob and rachel bradshah, that candidate is mitt romney. >> i don't know how voters loik mine the president could be for abortion the way he is, and support same-sex marriage. it's hard for me to -- somebody that claims to be a christian, you know, make statements to support things like that. >> it can't be an easy choice to make either way. >> reporter: wrestling with their votes. >> my religious beliefs, if anything it's probably going to end up being mitt romney. >> 57% of voters in the republican iowa caucuses identify themselves as evangelicals, supported rick santorum over mitt romney, many uneasy
, lady lynn is chief executive of the holding company, el rothschild, a democratic strategist and douglas is president of the american action forum and former director of the congressional budget office. i guess that means you know how to crunch numbers. lot of number crunching going on last night. but in the end, maybe you didn't really need to crunch them so much, douglas, because obama won pretty easily. >> it is one of the remarkable things that the end, the race looked like it looked a year ago, despite all the campaigning and money spent, that the polls going in were reflective of what came out. the only thing that happened was that for a month in between, there were hopes raised on the republican side because the momentum that appeared to gather hyped mitt romney. in the end, i think the president gets credit for a tremendous tactical victory. this was really a ground game in turning his voters out to the polls. it doesn't look like an whoever whelming governing mandate. >> gretchen: how does a republican, many people are going to ask -- lose against a man who has high gas prices,
. for a lot of people who follow politics, the fifth biggest county is el paso county, home to colorado springs. that is typically viewed as a republican stronghold. it is, but is also a big vote a bank for democrats. increasingly we have seen the ski areas that have started to trended democrat. the southwest corner of the state are two other ski resort communities that tented a democrat. host: a lot of focus on early voting in this contest. does colorado have it? what is it looking like? guest: we do, we have mailed ballots and early voting. we have already had more people vote overseas this year than all of 2008. like i said, we had 800,000 ballots returned. the republicans had a 20,000 ballot advantage. nobody knows how the unaffiliated voters are breaking. about 2 million people voted early are absentee and enter the 2008 election. that is expected to grow to 2.5 million this election cycle. keep in mind colorado has 2.8 million active voters, more when you look at inactive voters. about three-quarters of the vote should be conducted in colorado, maybe a little more prior to novembe
the fiscal cliff. here's a brief el strags of what we're talking about. the way things stand now an across the board spending cut is scheduled to hit every federal agency after december 31st. if congress does nothing before then, the cuts take effect no matter how badly the spending is needed. no matter how much it hurts, no matter who loses his or her job. at the same time everyone in the country gets hit with an across the board tax increase after the first of the year. you'll be paying more to the federal government no matter how much it hurts unless congress figures out how to stop it before december 31st. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. dana, this is big-time. this is a crucial issue that they have to resolve over the next, what, november and december. >> exactly. and the leader in the house and the leader in the senate wasted no time to come out and try to lay down markers. if you listen to the tone of both harry reid and house speaker john boehner each trying to sound as conciliatory and open to compromise as they can. watch what i'm talking about. >
, a stop on the way to his family's unimaginable destination, his own elite school dure ray doe -- el durado. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thongs -- thank you to the three authors, and we have time for two questions only. two questions only. thank you. >> hello. >> hi. >> well, thank you, that was really tremendously interesting. my question is you said something about see a lot of promise for the second term. i know none of us have a crystal ball, but seeing what you know, all three can speak to this, of the experience the last four years, what do we expect to see in the next four years, do you have any ideas? >> okay. [laughter] >> very quickly. i'm going to give an answer that sounds like it's old, but i think it's new, and that is, i think we -- many of us tend to forget that the health care act, which was enacted in the first term, will really be felt in the second term in so many ways, and i think that as that rolls out over the next two years, that that accomplishment, in and of itself, in the way it effects millions of people, much like as michael described th
that really moved the needle here? >>l, el w i'del llbeea ry coterested tolookeahe at t swing .s more than 30 counties onthat gade gor bush in 2004, and then turned around and went for obama in 2008. but then were strongp suporters of walker, both in h is if--n i his gubernatorial election n 2010 and in his recall. i could be curious to see the numbers. it looks like tnoutas henbeen very high, higher than it was orforlka wer.a ethe may have me difference. >> sreenivasan: i pulled u ap map ofthe re call results. yn eoou lok when you look te08wh rtsesul and thees walker results, there was that tidal shift. a at aathere the possible reasons t re cthatheyame back around? >> well, it was interest, that even during the recall, there were people who voted against the recall for governor walker. there was still strong support for obama, about 9%, 10% still approved of him. so i don't think for many people it was such a partisan issue. i think a lot of people just didn't see the recall as fair play or the appropriate way to remove a politician from office who hadn't done something illegal, say. so i
avocado and mix it with a cream el balsamic vinegar. >> thank you so much. more tips on our website that you can read through it all. thank you. >> coming up next, the pioneer woman ree drummond cooks up a classic comfort food with bacon. we can't wait, but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> this morning in "today's kitchen," what's for dinner, bacon-wrapped meatloaf. that's what's for dipper. that's all i'm going to say to get you up to the tv. ree drummond, aka the pie mere woman has a new book aka called "charlie and the christmas kitty." >> good morning, willie. >> the book comes together with the food here because charlie is like a bacon freak, is that right? >> that's the understatement of the year. i have this basset hound and he loves napping and bacon. >> a lot like me. >> yeah, me, too, come to think about it. i've blogged about charlie for years. he's this hilarious lazy dog and i've written a couple of children's books about him and my new book has a christmas theme. it documents what happens when a kitten comes into charlie's life so in honor of charlie the bacon lover i
, it is a wonderful analytic tool. host: on the democratic line, jim from el paso, texas. caller: i think there is a demographic, and i represented. i do not think the republicans even thought about it -- represent it. my wife is hispanic. i am anglo. my children are half and half. i am a democrat. my wife is hispanic, and hispanics voted largely democratic. if you add those numbers up, i think the gop is in more trouble than they think. guest: that is an interesting point and part of what i was alluding to in the beginning. cultural factors have alienated the republicans from a certain block of voters. voters who are more comfortable with the increasing diversity of the country, and those were less comfortable with that. it does not mean they are racist. it is a question of what people feel comfortable with. how they adjust to change. the republicans have gotten themselves in a position where the are reliant on those voters who are less comfortable with the changing nature of the country. over time, that is a shrinking group. the percentage of voters who are comfortable with the change i
] >> and tell us your name. >> marilyn hemmeasuring el. >> keep the microphone. i have a follow-up question. you give the analogy of parents paying their kids or giving their kids rewards for studying, learning, getting good grades? did you, did you ever pay your children for getting good grades? >> never, but i didn't have to. [laughter] >> they did well -- >> i meant different families, different households. but in a house o hold where this isn't encouraged and the school is doing the encouraging because the parents haven't or the kids aren't exposed, this is the responsibility of the school is to educate. parents aren't helping it along, the school has to do heroic things. >> heroic things. >> yes, heroic things. >> and heroic things may include $50 for an a? >> no, you said $2 a book. [laughter] difference. let's be reasonable. >> things within the bounds of the economy. >> yes. [laughter] >> yes. >> hi. i'm a former teacher, many, many, many years ago, and i think that in this, um, suggestion shows a lack of willingness and expectations. i think what you're talking about when parents don't
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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